Chrystul Kizer Faces Life In Prison For Killing Her Alleged Pedophile Sex Trafficker, Randy Volar



A young Black girl confessed to killing her white, male sex trafficker when he drugged her and tried to force her to have sex with him.

Now, she is facing life in prison.

Chrystul Kizer was 17 years old when she allegedly shot Randy Volar twice before setting his body on fire and taking off in his BMW, police said, the Washington Post reports

She was charged with first-degree intentional homicide, auto theft and arson for killing Volar, who was a Kenosha, Wisconsin, resident, the Washington Post reports.

Kizer met Volar when she was 16 and he was 33, the Washington Post reports. 

Prior to Kizer allegedly killing Volar, he had sexually abused her multiple times and filmed it, the Washington Post reports. 

Kizer was among other victims Volar sexually abused. He was arrested in February 2018 on charges including child sexual assault, but was released without bail, the Washington Post reports. 

Although police discovered evidence that Valor was abusing about a dozen underage
Black girls, he remained a free man, the Washington Post reports.

On June 5, 2018, Kizer went to Valor’s house and allegedly killed him after her drugged her. 

A few days later, she confessed and District Attorney Michael Graveley charged her with arson and first-degree intentional homicide, which carries a mandatory life sentence in Wisconsin, the Washington Post reports.

Graveley’s office knew about the evidence against Volar, but waited to prosecute him, the Washington Post reports.

“In many and most of the cases, we didn’t know the age,” Graveley said, the Washington Post reports. “So we literally did not know whether we had misdemeanors or felony.” 

Graveley said charges were brought against Kizer, because he believed her crime was premeditated. 

He argued that Kizer planned to murder Volar so she could steal his BMW, the Washington Post reports. 

Shortly before she killed him, Kizer posted a photo on Facebook with the caption, “My mugshot,” the Washington Post reports.

“I didn’t intentionally try to do this,” Kizer, who is now 19, told the Washington Post

Kizer maintains she was defending herself after Volar pinned her to the floor although she told him she didn’t want to have sex that night, the Washington Post reports.

She went to his house after fearing her boyfriend, Delane Nelson, was going to physically hurt her, something he’d done in the past, the Washington Post reports. 

“I had went into [Valor’s] house … He had ordered some pizza. We were smoking, and he asked me if I wanted to drink any liquor. And then he had gave me this drug. I don’t know what it’s called. And after that, we started to watch movies … And then, the drug, it made me feel weird or whatever,” Kizer told the Washington Post

“He started to touch my leg and then like I had jumped and tell him that I didn’t want to do that,” she told the Washington Post

Kizer said Volar told her she owed him, the Washington Post reports.

“I tried to get up, to get away from him but I had tripped, and I fell on the floor, and he had got on top of me,” she said, the Washington Post reports. “And he was trying to like, rip my pants off, my jeans that I had on … I was, like, wiggling. Cause once me and [Nelson] had fought, he had tried to pin me down, but I’ll wiggle to get loose.”

She doesn’t remember going to get the pistol. She does remember the sound it made, the Washington Post reports.

“Like a pop. A high pop,” she told the Washington Post. “I started to panic.”

According to the Washington Post, most states have a law that gives sex-trafficking victims an “affirmative defense,” which allows them to be acquitted of certain charges against them if they can prove at trial that they committed a crime because they were being trafficked. 

Under federal law, all children who are bought or sold for sex are trafficking victims, regardless of the circumstances, the Washington Post reports.

Wisconsin upholds the “affirmative defense” law, but Judge David P. Wilk decided Kizer does not have access to that law and, in his view, neither would other trafficking victims charged with violent crimes, the Washington Post reports. 

Kizer’s attorney, Carl Johnson, plans to appeal the ruling. Meanwhile, Kizer was returned to jail. 

“The true story has yet to be told,” Volar’s father said in a statement, the Washington Post reports. “And when the truth comes out, I hope people’s perceptions of my son will change. My son was a good man, loved by his family and respected for his kindness and intelligence. We all miss him dearly and would do anything to turn back the hands of time so we could be with him. What happened is a tragedy for both families the Kizers and the Volars.”





Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.